Posts Tagged ‘madam butterfly royal opera house’

On the 2015 production of Madama Butterfly by the Royal Opera House

April 9, 2015

Went to see it this afternoon. This review is by a new guest author Patrick Murray

Set at the end of the Japanese period of isolation Puccini’s Madama Butterfly is a tragic tale, based on a true story, of an innocent young Geisha, Butterfly, who renounces her culture, religion and family to marry an American sailor, Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton. He abandons her, returning several years later with an American wife in tow. All this time Butterfly believes he will come back to her and raises their son. This is not to be. Forced to give up her son to the new American wife, she kills herself “to die with honour” rather than live without it.

Speaking of living without honour, where to start with Mr Pinkerton? He is a shallow, ignorant, arrogant man who respects nothing important. He does not respect Butterfly’s culture and he does not respect love. This is portrait of a man who is little more than a moral vacuum. However he does not marry her out of malice, but because he believes love is about joy and happiness and that this is a good intervention in Butterfly’s life, despite repeated warnings from his friend. Needless to say, Pinkerton is proven drastically wrong. His final moment of shameful dishonour is when, upon his return to Japan, he realises what he has done and stricken with guilt he flees as he cannot bring himself to face his former wife. It is left to others to clear up the mess he has made.

The production from the Royal Opera House was quite simply magnificent. Puccini’s rich, beautiful music was played brilliantly, from the dramatic crescendos to the tender moments of hope and heartbreak. The cast was superb. Kristine Opolais as Butterfly was incredible in particular, but it feels wrong to single out any particular individual.

It is not hard to miss the symbolism that Puccini is going for here. The final scene of her plunging a dagger into her chest as her son waves a miniature American flag whilst the cherry blossom falls from a tree speaks to that. In truth it is such an incendiary opera that one wonders whether Puccini would have prosecuted for incitement or radicalisation if he composed it today!

My only regret is that this was the final performance with Opolais so I can’t see it again. Just magnificent – 5 stars from me!

Patrick Murray